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Sport

How often should i be training?

By StuartSport 27 Feb 2019

 Over the last couple of week we have looked at the health benefits of exercise, what DOMS is ( the pain you get in your muscles the day or two after working out) and we’ve also debunked the theory that lifting weights or doing resistance training will make you bulky.

 We’re now going to have a look at exercise frequency.

 One of the most common questions that we are asked is “How often should I be working out”?

 The answer: It depends.

 It depends on the type of exercise you will be doing. It depends on how much exercise you’ve done before. It depends if you’ve had an injury. It depends on what your goals are.

 Fitness goals are completely individual for each person. There is a broad range of objectives, or reasons, for wanting to exercise. Some of these include:

  • Improving Posture

  • Improving flexibility

  • Improving strength or endurance

  • Improving cardiovascular fitness

  • Losing Weight or body fat

  • Increasing muscular hypertrophy

  • Improving muscle tone

  • Improving health or wellbeing; this can include managing stress or lowering blood pressure.

There are a few things to take into consideration before propelling yourself into an intense, 7 day workout plan that you saw an ex Love Island contestant doing on their Instagram story.

Going into exercise that is too intense can lead to long recovery periods. You know, the ones where you struggle to walk for a couple of days after. Exercise that is too intense can also lead to injury, which could mean time off the gym.

 It’s important to consider your training experience before committing to a new training program, as this will determine the frequency (how often), duration and intensity of training required to meet your goals.

Goals will become more specific and training systems more advanced as the frequency of resistance training increases. For example, a beginner might work with a single-set system which has a whole-body approach and train two-three times per week, whereas an advanced client may train more frequently, using a split routine (different muscles on different days of the week). Exceeding the maximum recommended frequency on a regular bias would be inadvisable, as your ability to recover from the load would be compromised.

 

 

 The table below shows some frequency guidelines for RESITANCE TRAINING.

 

 

Training Status
Frequency Guidelines
(Sessions Per Week)
Example System and Training Approach
                             Beginner                           2  – 3
  • Single – Set or circuit weight training
  • Whole-body approach
  • Fewer Repetitions
                          Intermediate                           3  - 4
  • Multiple-Set
  • Repetitions and resistance varied to achieve specific fitness goals.
 
                            Advanced.                           4 - 7
  • Split routine (different muscle trained on different days of the week), with advanced training systems.
  • Repetitions and resistance varied to achieve specific fitness goals.
Baechle and Earle, 2000.

 

So,  if you're new to resistance training start out with fewer sessions at a lower intensity.

As you begin to  become used to the type of exercise you are doing, gradually look to not only increase your weights but also the number of sets and reps that do in your workout. This will go a long way to helping you achieve your goals!

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